2.0 STRATEGIC & OPERATIONAL PLANNING

STRATEGIC AND OPERATIONAL PLANNING CONSISTS OF THE PLANNING PROCESS, THE IDENTIFICATION OF GOALS AND ACTIONS NECESSARY TO ACHIEVE SUCCESS, AND THE DEPLOYMENT OF THOSE ACTIONS TO ALIGN THE WORK OF THE ORGANIZATION. THE FACILITIES ORGANIZATION SHOULD ANTICIPATE MANY FACTORS IN ITS STRATEGIC PLANNING EFFORTS: CHANGING CUSTOMER EXPECTATIONS, BUSINESS AND PARTNERING OPPORTUNITIES, TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS, EVOLVING REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS, AND SOCIETAL EXPECTATIONS, TO NAME BUT A FEW.

2.1 A STRATEGIC PLAN EXISTS THAT INCLUDES THE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE DEPARTMENT.

 

2.2 THE STRATEGIC PLAN WAS DEVELOPED WITH PARTICIPATION FROM INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS, APPROVED BY THE ADMINISTRATION, AND EFFECTIVELY COMMUNICATED.

(Note: Related criteria in some categories were grouped together in our 2008 OUTLINE FOR EXCELLENCE for ease and simplicity of tracking; thus, in some cases in our submission, there are no bullets for an individual criterion because it previously had been grouped with the one above it. In other cases, such as exists here with 2.1 and 2.2, we left the criteria grouped for continuity as we think the response reads easily while still allowing for the criteria to be discussed. The original 2008 OUTLINE FOR EXCELLENCE is included in the material provided.)

2.2-Strategic Plan-For InText on WebsiteNMSU has a current strategic plan with goals and objectives as does Administration and Finance and Facilities and Services.31 Most of the units in Facilities and Services have developed their own mission statement, goals, and values.32 The strategies and objectives necessary for success are accompanied by measureable goals that are integrated into the performance evaluation process.33

As mentioned previously in the submission, the Facilities and Services initial independent effort towards developing a strategic plan was deferred until after the division plan was developed, because we wanted to make sure our objectives supported the upper level efforts. The Administration and Finance Division Strategic Plan was the culmination of thirteen months of information gathering and collaborative work, and the general process was comprehensive and thoughtful.

A Steering Group consisting of division and unit leaders began meeting in August 2012 to lay the framework for the plan and to formulate mission, vision, and value statements, as well as the division’s preliminary objectives that were developed to meet the university’s Seven Goals for Success.

The Steering Group engaged CommTech Transformations to provide the situational and SWOT analysis that helped identify the internal strengths and weaknesses of the division, as well as the opportunities and threats to its success.34 CommTech visited the NMSU campus for eight days in October 2012 to meet with a range of NMSU community members and gather their input about the division.

When the results of the CommTech visit were delivered, five workgroups (one for each unit within the Administration and Finance Division) met to develop objectives, strategies and metrics for each of the Goals for Success. The input from the workgroups was compiled by the Steering Group and presented for review by inter‐and‐intra‐departmental staff, campus administrative groups, and the university community at-large before submission to NMSU Chancellor. Facilities and Services then subsequently circled back with CommTech Transformations and made sure that our goals and objectives within the OUTLINE FOR EXCELLENCE supported the higher‐level strategic plan.35

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2.3 CUSTOMER NEEDS AND EXPECTATIONS SERVE AS MAJOR DRIVERS FOR SETTING STRATEGIC DIRECTION.

  • A strategic plan for OFS will be developed with input from internal and external stakeholders. This plan will be submitted to the administration and published on the website when approved.
  • The Internal Advisory Committee (IAV) has completed the departmental Mission Statement, Core Values, and Goals. The IAV has been reformulated and will begin work on the departmental strategic plan in the 2012‐13 timeframe.
  • Regular meetings with all constituencies are held.

In 2010, Facilities and Services brought Steven Thweatt of Emory University to campus (he later moved to the University of Colorado and recently retired) for an evaluation of the Project Development and Engineering group. His evaluation included customer listening sessions that ultimately led to changes in the project process. One of these was a process improvement move to the “concept‐to‐completion” delivery method where a single project manager is responsible for taking a project from “cradle‐to‐grave.”36

CommTech Transformations also met with customer groups when conducting the environmental scan; the most often repeated constructive criticisms we receive relate to long lead times on projects and work orders and the subsequent communications about delays.37 In response to these concerns, we have developed our Key Performance Indicators and metrics around measuring process improvement activities in these areas. We also made organizational changes with the warehouse as we work towards accelerating material delivery.38

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2.4 GOALS AND KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES ARE UNDERSTOOD BY ALL AND PERIODICALLY REVIEWED.

 

2.5 PERFORMANCE MEASURES AT EACH LEVEL OF THE ORGANIZATION ARE USED TO MEET GOALS.

  • Regular management reports will be developed through the new work order system. These reports will provide Directors and Supervisors with the information necessary to make sound business decisions.
  • Utility plant performance indicators will be developed and used for maintenance planning, upgrade evaluation, and the APPA FPI is adding a Green Globes metric. Sightlines reports are used across the organization.
  • New metrics were developed in support of the Administration and Finance Strategic Plan and the NMSU Vision 2020 Plan.
  • Every Executive Director was assigned key performance indicators that aligned with the Facilities and Services goals, the Administration and Finance Strategic Plan, and Vision 2020.

As an overall measure of Facilities and Services performance, a customer satisfaction survey is emailed to the NMSU System annually. An Employee Engagement Survey that separates results by work groups and by supervisory and non‐supervisory levels was conducted in 2013 and 2014 and follow‐up surveys are planned for every two years.39 Sightlines and the APPA Facilities Performance Indicators are also reviewed with staff, and we discussed some of the more important benchmarks last year at the Annual Meeting with every employee.40

As noted in 2.3, the most often repeated constructive criticism we receive relates to long lead times on projects and work orders, and our benchmarks confirm that we have room for improvement.41 Facility Operations and Project Development and Engineering both use Key Performance Indicators to evaluate their progress toward their goal of accelerating service and delivery times. In particular, Project Development and Engineering has made significant improvement in reducing the project completion times; Facilities and Services presented a plan for improvements in the materials warehouse that led to an organizational realignment. We anticipate this move will reduce material procurement times.42

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2.6 A BUDGET IS DEVELOPED WITH INPUT FROM STAFF THAT REFLECTS HISTORIC EXPENDITURES, AN ANALYSIS OF NEEDS, EFFECTIVE ALLOCATION OF AVAILABLE RESOURCES TO SUPPORT THE ORGANIZATION’S GOALS AND OBJECTIVES, AND SEEKS NEW AND INNOVATIVE MEASURES TO LEVERAGE RESOURCES.

  • OFS staff will be directly involved in the preparation of the budget. This “needs analysis” will be tied to the results of the surveys mentioned in the Performance Survey section so that the budget reflects actual, prioritized needs.
  • Each unit presents their budget to the Directors monthly, and the supervisors are encouraged to use Sightlines and the APPA FPI to make comparisons.
  • The establishment of valid metrics remains both a top priority and an elusive goal.
  • New metrics were developed in support of the Administration and Finance Strategic Plan and the NMSU Vision 2020 Plan.
  • FS conducts an internal budget process with annual hearings.

2.6-Sightline-Aligning Investments-For In Text on Website

NMSU Facilities and Services implemented an internal budget process five years ago. We request that each unit prepare a budget cut scenario, typically at the 1% and 3% level; this year we requested a 5% scenario to align with the university budget reduction initiative. Each unit may then request money for new initiatives although this is not a requirement. We set aside a half‐day for budget hearings and each unit presents their business case at an open session that anyone may attend.43 We reallocate resources to keep pace with changing trends through this process. We have added staff at Environmental Health and Safety while reducing where we were a little overstaffed in Facility Operations, and we have been able to reduce staff in the grounds and custodial departments through the purchase of new equipment.

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2.7 STANDARDS HAVE BEEN DEFINED FOR OVERALL OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE, BUILT ENVIRONMENT, AND LANDSCAPE.

The state of New Mexico Executive Order 2006‐001 mandates that public buildings in excess of 15,000 square feet should be built to and achieve a minimum rating of LEED™ Silver and that the project must achieve a minimum delivered energy performance standard of one half the U.S. energy consumption for that building type as defined by the U.S. Department of Energy. Facilities and Services designs and builds to meet or exceed these standards, and new construction projects model the energy consumption of the proposed facility as part of our planning process.

The Custodial Department has Green Cleaning Guidelines, and Facilities Operations sets standards for grounds and custodial using the APPA Standards. Facilities and Services maintains a complete set of Design Guidelines, a Master Plan, and numerous supporting plans; these are living documents that guide the development of our built environment. Facilities and Services received a Getty Grant to prepare a Historical Preservation Plan that we use when repairing and renovating our heritage facilities, and landscape standards are called out in the Master Plan.44

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2.8 A CAMPUS MASTER PLAN IS IN PLACE, CURRENT , AND UTILIZED FOR DECISION MAKING.

  • OFS will work with OFPC to update existing design guidelines and to develop new standards as required. Sustainability will be integral throughout all standards.
  • A Master Plan was developed, and is undergoing a 5‐year revision.
  • The first version of the Design Guidelines has been published on the Facilities and Services website.  
  • The Master Plan was refreshed and related supporting master plans were started.  
  • The Design Guidelines are continually being updated.

NMSU Facilities and Services maintains a Master Plan that assists in decision making for proposed development and changes to the campus. The current Master Plan 2006‐2016 was the result of a collaborative process led by the University Architect. In early 2012, we decided that a “refresh” of the Master Plan was necessary in order to focus on specific areas of future implementation.45 The Master Plan was subsequently updated in 2013 with the involvement of many of the same groups as in 2005. The next full Master Plan review will be proposed for 2016, and will focus on proposed developments and strategic “gateways” for the campus such as the Heritage Farm, Arrowhead, Housing and the University Avenue Corridor. 46

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2.9 THE OPERATIONAL UNITS PARTICIPATE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM AND ARE ACTIVE PARTICIPANTS IN THE ACCEPTANCE OF COMPLETED PROJECTS.

  • OFS will work with OFPC to improve communications during the construction process and to develop a smooth process for acceptance of projects.
  • The Office of Facilities Planning and Construction (OFPC) and Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) merged with Facilities and services in July of 2010.
  • Fire Services was consolidated in 2012.
  • Facility Operations has provided input into the Design Guidelines.
  • Plans and specifications are published on the website and review is solicited.  
  • Project Development and Engineering has developed multiple approaches to solicit shop input.

Facilities and Services developed a “Plan Review” process patterned after seeing the Missouri State University process at CAPPA 2011.47 An email list‐serve is maintained, and project plans are posted when delivered by the design professionals. Project Development and Engineering solicits input from trades, Environmental Health and Safety, and the Fire Department as well as from the customer. To foster additional input and to facilitate that sense of involvement we are striving for, formal “page turn” sessions are being conducted. The review comments are then distributed to the design team.48

When projects are complete, training is conducted for the Facility Operations staff. Facility Operations is also involved in “final clean” and the acceptance of the finished product, and also participates in the one‐ year “warranty walk.”

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2.10 STRATEGIES AND PROCESSES ARE IN PLACE TO ENSURE CONTINUITY OF FUNCTIONS IN THE EVENT OF STAFF TURNOVER OR OTHER DISRUPTION.

  • Personnel will be developed through cross‐functional training, the sharing of information, and continuing education.
  • Facilities and Services implemented a procedure where every supervisor must identify a backup when absent for any length of time.  
  • Two folks from Facility Operations and one from Project Development have started attending the multi‐part APPA Facilities Institute.  
  • Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) oversees administration the All Hazards Emergency Operations Plan and Continuity of Operations Plan (AHEOP and COOP).49

NMSU Facilities and Services staff designates a contact person to fill in when they are on planned leave by sending out a delegation of authority email.50 Staff meetings for individual groups within Facilities and Services are held on a weekly basis for general knowledge and for project coordination within the campus, and in case of an unexpected absence from work, team members are able to assist on various tasks and assume responsibilities for each other. These processes that involve multiple group members on projects and tasks are invaluable in the event of staff turnover or absence. Facilities and Services encourages staff development and internal promotions to further minimize disruptions to each unit when departures take place.

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2.11 EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANS ARE IN PLACE, CURRENT, AND COMMUNICATED TO FACILITIES EMPLOYEES AND THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY AS REQUIRED.

  • OFS will collaborate with other departments as needed to accomplish this goal.
  • EHS communicates the All Hazards Plan and Facility Operations works with the Emergency Planning Committee.
  • Facilities and Services and Environmental Health and Safety represented NMSU on the committee developing the Doña Ana County All Hazards Mitigation Plan.
  • The Doña Ana County All Hazards Mitigation Plan was submitted and approved.
  • FS is well represented on the NMSU Emergency Planning Committee and acts as chair.51

NMSU and Facilities and Services are committed to the safety of those who come to our campus to study, work or visit. Environmental Health and Safety administers the All Hazards Emergency Operation Plan that has been established as a guidance document for university administrators and emergency response personnel for the handling of emergencies, major incidents and/or disasters. This plan establishes a framework for administrators and responders that ensures coordination, communication, and cooperation in times of crisis. Separate emergency planning documents are also established and maintained at the individual unit level, such as university departments and remote sites. These individual plans address emergency exit plans, lines of succession, communication plans, and continuity of operations. This past year, Environmental Health and Safety updated our efforts in conjunction with the Doña Ana County All Hazards Plan; our Facilities Essential Personnel process and list was revised; and the annual update of the All Hazards Emergency Operations Plan was completed.52 The Emergency Planning Committee meets monthly and is charged with university planning, preparedness, response, recovery, assisting in consequence management, and post‐incident reviews.53

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